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Thursday, November 23, 2017

When running any kind of wires for networked equipment (ie. printers, PC's, video cameras, door locks and readers, etc,) who would be the ultimate authority to ensure code requirements are not violated?

When running any kind of wires for networked equipment (ie. printers, PC's, video cameras, door locks and readers, etc,) who would be the ultimate authority to ensure code requirements are not violated?

  • The local fire marshal.
  • The local building inspector.
  • The state fire marshal and state building inspector.
  • The authority having jurisdiction. 
 
When running any kind of wires for networked equipment (ie. printers, PC's, video cameras, door locks and readers, etc,) who would be the ultimate authority to ensure code requirements are not violated?

EXPLANATION

The Authority Having Jurisdiction, or AHJ, is a general term for whatever agency has the ultimate authority concerning building and life safety codes for a given locality. That authority can vary by location and region, and also by what the actually work pertains to. It can be building inspector, fire marshal, a port authority if the property location falls under such province, a health inspector are some examples.
This may seem like an out of place question for IT matters, but considering many IT professionals are required, or prefer to do "do it yourself" (DIY) projects which sometimes involves running wires, it's important to know the laws and governance that regulate where and how wires are run, the type used, and if any special licensing is required to run such wires. Even a simple wire run in the ceiling from one room to another might run afoul of local building codes. It's also good to know if using contractors to insure they know what they are doing.

SOURCE

https://www.nfpa.org/Assets/files/AboutTheCodes/101/101_FAQs.pdf
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